Home » For Students » For Employers » Legal and Human Rights

Legal and Human Rights

As employers, it is important to create an environment where people feel safe and respected enough to disclose their disabilities, and inform you of their accommodations. In addition, it is important to meet these needs to the best of your ability because it will ultimately lead you the the most capable and happy employee. However, it can be awkward and vague discussing disclosure and asking for accommodations. You may face a gray area of knowing what is might be fair accommodations versus unequal preferences. How much of an employee’s capability should be kept for privacy reasons, and how much should be shared due to safety? This section will best address how, what, why, and when to expect to disclosure and need for accommodations.

The Duty to Accommodate 

Written by Samantha Dubord

Important Note: The following information is not intended as legal advice. Do not rely upon this information as an alternative to advice from a legal professional. Should you have questions about a legal issue, you should seek legal advice.

Table of Contents

1           What Type of Employee are You?

1.1         Overview

1.2         How to know if you are a federally regulated employee?

2            Introduction to Human Rights Legislation

2.1         Human Rights Legislation across Canada

2.2         Applicable Legislation

2.2.1      The Canadian Human Rights Act

2.2.2      The Employment Equity Act

2.3         What is discrimination?

2.4         What is a disability?

3            Disclosing a Disability

3.1         When are you legally obligated to disclose your disability?

3.2         How much information must you disclose?

3.3         To whom should you disclose?

3.4         Employer’s obligation in respects to privacy

4            Your Right to Equal Employment

5            Employer’s Duty to Accommodate

5.1         Definition of duty to accommodate

5.2         What are the parameters of the duty to accommodate?

5.2.1      When does the duty to accommodate come into play?

5.2.2      Accommodation

5.2.3      Undue hardship

5.2.4      Bona fide occupational requirement

5.3         Rights and Obligations

5.3.1      Employee

5.3.2      Employer

5.3.3      Union

6            Losing Your Job

6.1         When can an employer terminate your employment?

6.1.1      General principles

6.1.2      Human Rights and Frustration of Employment Contract

6.2         What are the employee’s rights after losing their employment?

7            Filing a Complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission

7.1         Overview

7.2         The process

7.2.1      Filing a complaint

7.2.2      After you’ve filed your complaint

7.2.3      The Tribunal’s decision

7.3         What Should You Expect?

7.3.1      Corrective measures

7.3.2      Others implications

8            Information for Human Rights Commissions in Canada

8.1         Canada (Federal)

8.2         Provinces

8.3         Territories

9            Sources Consulted

9.1         Articles

9.2         Websites

9.3         Case Law

9.4         Legislation

1  What type of Employee are You?

1.1 Overview

Canada’s constitutional separation of powers between the federal and provincial governments establishes which government, federal or provincial, can take action or enact legislation on certain areas of Canadian life. This distinction becomes important when you file a human rights complaint. In your case, it is important to know under which jurisdiction a complaint must be addressed. This will depend on whether you are a federally or provincially regulated employee.

1.2  How to know if you are a federally regulated employee?

There exists a presumption that the everyday regulation of businesses and employment contracts within these businesses falls under provincial jurisdiction. The only exception applies when the business is a federal undertaking. This means that the business, due to its nature, falls under a federal “head of power” assigned by the Constitution. For this reason, only certain employment sectors in Canada fall under the federal jurisdiction.

In order to know if you are a federally regulated employee, the principle nature of the work you are doing must be functionally linked to the federal undertaking.

The following are a few key examples of federal businesses. Do you work for…

  • The federal government?
  • A bank?
  • A transportation company (such as an aviation, navigation, train, bus or trucking company) that extends beyond the limits of a province?
  • A telecommunication company (such as Bell or Rogers)?
  • A radio or television broadcasting station?
  • A telephone company (with connections between provinces or that is part of a company who is continuously extra-provincial)?
  • An internet service provider?
  • A post office?
  • A nuclear power plant?

While these are only guidelines, if you answered yes to any of the above, it is a strong indicator that you are a federally regulated employee.

TIP: Talk to your employer or seek legal advice if you are still uncertain whether you are a federal employee before filing a human rights complaint.

The information on this website is applicable specifically to federally regulated employees and employers. If you are a federal employee, you must file a human rights complaint through the Canadian Human Rights Commission. If you are a provincially or territorially regulated employee, you should refer to the resources available in your jurisdiction (see below) which may be of more use to you and your specific concerns.

2  Introduction to Human Rights Legislation

2.1 Human Rights Legislation across Canada

The following are pieces of human rights legislation that govern throughout Canada in their respective jurisdictions:

Refer to section “What type of employee are you?” to see where your search should begin! [ASK JASON HOW I MAKE A LINK FOR THIS]

2.2  Applicable Legislation

For your purposes, we will examine the Canadian Human Rights Act and the Employment Equity Act which both apply to the federal employment sector in Canada.

2.2.1 The Canadian Human Rights Act

Human rights legislation was created to recognize the dignity and value of all Canadians and to ensure that all are treated equally and are able to be active members of society. This is true for both federal and provincial legislation, including the Canadian Human Rights Act. The piece of legislation puts in place mechanisms in order to ensure that the rights of all persons are protected. The legislation is reparative and not punitive.

In terms of employment and labour law, the Act recognizes that all employees falling within a protected class of discrimination should be accommodated unless doing so would cause undue hardship for the employer.

If you are denied an accommodation and fall under a protected class of discrimination, you can file a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission about any discriminatory behavior that occurs during (1) the interview and screening process, (2) the employment relationship and (3) the termination of the employment.

Important: Please note that you must file a complaint within one (1) year of the alleged discriminatory conduct.

2.2.2  The Employment Equity Act

The Employment Equity Act has a goal of eliminating inequality for reasons unrelated to ability to perform a job in federal workplaces. This piece of legislation explains that equality is more than treating everyone the same but that it sometimes requires special treatment in order to achieve true equality.

The Act creates an obligation placed on your employer to identify and eliminate barriers in the workplace and put in place new policies, practices, and accommodations in order to ensure that there is a representation of all occupational groups in the workplace. Your employer must conduct an analysis of the workplace in order to evaluate the representation of these groups and must set goals and act accordingly in order to increase representation where needed.

2.3 What is Discrimination?

Discrimination is a distinction, based on personal characteristics, that causes a person or group of persons to be disadvantaged or denied an advantage that others have. The Canadian Human Rights Act prevents your employer from discriminating against you based on 11 specified grounds.

These grounds are: race, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, age, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, family status, disability and pardoned convictions. For your purposes, we will only be examining discrimination on the ground of a disability. It should be noted that you can be discriminated against on more than one ground at one time.

Discrimination is analyzed uniquely on the effect the Act has on you as an employee, and not based on the intention of your employer. Discrimination also includes any retaliation suffered for making a human rights complaint in regards to a disability issue.

2.4  What is a Disability?

The Canadian Human Rights Act states that a disability includes both mental and physical disabilities as well as drug or alcohol dependence and also refers to past or current disabilities.

In the Employment Equity Act, the term is defined by describing a person with a disability as a person who has “a long-term or recurring physical, mental, sensory, psychiatric or learning impairment”. The disability makes the person feel disadvantaged and the employer is also likely to determine that the person is disadvantaged in the workplace.

It should be noted that the Employment Equity Act does not consider accommodation for short-term disabilities while the Canadian Human Rights Act does.

The term has also been defined in many cases and has been given a broad interpretation. The following are some examples of recognized disabilities:

  • Blindness and severe visual impairment
  • Deafness and severe hearing impairment
  • Speech impairment
  • Mobility impairment, such as paraplegia, quadriplegia, amputation, neurological conditions that can effect mobility such as Multiple Sclerosis
  • Chronic pain, such as arthritis, migraines, back pain, etc.
  • Addictions, for example, to alcohol or drugs, etc.
  • Learning disabilities such as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADHD), dyslexia, etc.
  • Chronic diseases or conditions, such as diabetes, asthma, cancer, etc.
  • Psychiatric disabilities, such as depression, schizophrenia, etc.
  • Environmental sensitivities
  • Developmental disabilities such as autism, down syndrome, etc.

3  Disclosing a Disability

3.1 When are you legally obligated to disclose your disability?

If you have a visible disability, disclosure of your disability to your employer may not be a concern to you. However, you may still need to disclose information about your visible disability if you are in need of a specific accommodation where there are functional limitations which would not be apparent to your employer.

Furthermore, in many cases where your disability is not visible, you do not have the legal obligation to inform your employer about it. On the other hand, in some cases it becomes your legal obligation to disclose your disability.

Firstly, you must disclose a disability when you are in need of an accommodation in the workplace, during the interview process or at any other time in relation to your employment or the process of applying for employment. The reason for this is that your employer cannot be held liable in a human rights complaint when the company is unaware of a disability. Essentially, what your employer, or individuals working on behalf of the employer with respect to hiring/management or human resources, do not know cannot be held against them.

Secondly, you must disclose your disability if it is likely to affect your work performance, attendance or your ability to effectuate the essential duties of the job. As a general principle, if you choose not to disclose your disability, it is important that you be able to complete all the essential duties of the job before accepting it.

Finally, if your disability creates health or safety risks for yourself or your co-workers, you are also legally obligated to inform your employer about it.

3.2  How much information must you disclose?

When disclosing your disability to your employer, you have the obligation to give sufficient information in regards to your disability in order to support your request for accommodation and in order for your employer to properly and promptly fulfill the duty to accommodate.

You have no obligation to give your employer the exact diagnosis of your disability, but you must describe the nature of the disability and any functional limitations that you may have in fulfilling your job duties. Your functional limitations should be assessed by a medical professional and, in some restricted cases, your employer may be within his rights to ask for further information or assessments.

In the event that your disability is affecting your work, if you choose not to cooperate or share relevant information about your disability, your employer may have met the duty to accommodate and may be within their rights to terminate your employment.

In addition to the above, you have the obligation to inform your employer if an attempted accommodation is not properly working and you need further or alternate accommodations. Your employer will not be discriminating against you if he is not made aware of further issues related to your disability that have a direct impact on performance and full participation in the workplace.

3.3  To whom should you disclose?

Outside of your legal obligations set out above, it is your prerogative what information about your disability you choose to share and whom you choose to share it with. However, it is clear that not everyone can assist you with an accommodation. You should find out as soon as possible who is in a position to assist you with your accommodation request. For example, depending on the company, your manager/supervisor may be that person or it could be staff in the Human Resources department.

If you are a unionized employee, a great place to start is to discuss with your union representative what steps you should be taking and the right person or office you should disclose information about your disability.

If you are not a unionized employee, you may have to find this out on your own. The appropriate person may differ depending on the size of the business or the workplace. For example, you can disclose to an interviewer during your initial interview, your supervisor when you start working or an Human Resources (HR) representative if there is an HR department within the business (this is usually the case for larger employers).

3.4  Employer’s obligation in respects to privacy

When you inform your employer of a disability, the company has a legal obligation to keep that information confidential according to the Privacy Act. The necessary information may be shared with people who need to know about your disability and limitations (i.e. your supervisor).

You have the right to ask your employer about the collection and use of the information you provide in regards to your disability. You also have the right to access for your employer’s policies and procedures on collection and use of confidential information if they exist.

4  Your Right to Equal Employment

Your employer cannot discriminate against you based on a protected ground of discrimination while going through the hiring process for a position. The practical difficulty here is that it is very hard to know, when you don’t get offered a position you’ve applied for, whether you did not obtain the job in good faith or if the decision was based on a discriminatory factor.

You have the right to file a human rights complaint if you believe you were discriminated against by a potential employer due to your disability. However, this may be very difficult to prove in many cases as discrimination during the application and interview process is not usually blatantly obvious. An example of a more obvious discriminatory practice could be asking to disclose a disability in an application form. Another example would be denying your right to an interview if you are a wheelchair user by providing you with an interview in a physically accessible location.

In addition, the Employment Equity Act requires federal employers to provide equal employment opportunities to certain disadvantaged groups: (1) disabled persons; (2) women; (3) aboriginal peoples; (4) other members of visible minorities. This offers these groups an extra layer of protection as well as more chances in obtaining employment in the federal public and private sectors to ensure equity of representation in the federal government and all employers that are federally regulated.

Finally, as mentioned above, if you need an accommodation during the interview and application process, you may inform your potential employer and he or she will have the duty to accommodate you.

5 Employer’s Duty to Accommodate

5.1 Definition of duty to accommodate

Your employer is obligated to take every reasonable step in order to accommodate you when you are experiencing discrimination due to a rule, practice or physical barrier in the workplace. Your employer must ensure that you are being treated equally to other employees. The duty to accommodate requires employers to identify and eliminate these rules, practices or barriers that have a discriminatory impact by incorporating alternative arrangements. The duty to accommodate only applies to prohibited grounds of discrimination, such as a disability.

The duty to accommodate is not absolute. Your employer must only accommodate your needs to the point of undue hardship. Your employer’s refusal to accommodate you may also be justified by a bona fide occupational requirement.

5.2  What are the Parameters of the Duty to Accommodate?

It is your employer’s responsibility to make serious and genuine efforts when looking for an accommodation suitable for you. It is not sufficient to make assumptions of what accommodation options may or may not be available. In case of a refusal to accommodate, your employer must have concrete evidence showing that the refusal was founded.

5.2.1  When does the duty to accommodate come into play?

Again, as mentioned above, you have a right not to be discriminated against from the application and interview process up to and including the termination of your employment. The duty to accommodate, therefore, comes into play from your first interaction with your potential employer.

If you have particular needs due to a disability that may affect your work (protected grounds of discrimination), it is your personal responsibility to inform your employer about them (see section on disclosure).

The duty to accommodate may also arise during the employment relationship, preventing you from work in the same capacity you did before. For example, this may be the case if you become disabled or ill or suffer from an addiction or if you realize that an existent and undisclosed disability is affecting your work performance. Persons with episodic disabilities including Multiple Sclerosis, Lupus or other neurological conditions may experience periods of relative good health and then face a decline in their health and physical well-being which can effect performance, where the employee must work (either in the workplace or from home), as well as the number of hours one can work. A person with a disabling condition that is episodic may need an accommodation such as flexible hours or other flexible work arrangement. Similar circumstances may result when an employee is dealing with a mental health condition. In these circumstances, your employer also has an obligation to provide you with an accommodation before terminating your employment.

Finally, if you do not disclose your disability, there is still a possibility that your employer has an obligation to initiate the accommodation process in order to see if you are in need of an accommodation in cases where performance problems arise under questionable circumstances. This may be more common in the case of a mental health disability which may not yet be diagnosed or is not constantly apparent. Essentially, if your employer suspects you may have an undisclosed disability which is affecting your work performance, he must act accordingly and appropriately before terminating your employment

5.2.2  Accommodation

An accommodation can manifest itself in different forms. There can be different accommodations for different people and different disabilities. Your employer should adhere to the following three-step test in his attempt to reasonably accommodate your needs.

  • Can you perform your job duties as is?
  • If not, can you perform your job with modified duties?
  • If not, can you perform another existing, modified or re-bundled [1] job?

The efforts made to find you an accommodation must, at minimum, be consistent with the type of work you were hired to do. If your employer is able to offer you an appropriate accommodation, you must be able to perform the essential duties of this new or modified job. However, each case must be evaluated on its own merits and accommodation must remain a factual determination.

The following are some examples of different accommodations that may be available to you:

  • Alternative work (another position or modified duties in your current position)
  • Alternative work hours
  • Flexible break times
  • Wheelchair access ramp
  • Interpreters

If you are a unionized employee, you should contact your union representative who will often have good advice on your employer’s accommodation practices and policies.

5.2.2.1  The Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (AODA)

In regards to physical accommodations and accessibility, provincial legislation such as the AODA was created as a public initiative in order to put into effect the protection of the rights of persons with disabilities enacted in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as well as the Ontario Human Rights Code. This piece of legislation applies to all levels of government, non-profit organizations as well as private sector businesses in Ontario.

This legislation, which was enacted in 2005, has the objective of making Ontario accessible to all by 2025. Ontario provincial workplaces must meet general accessibility targets at specific time marks in order to fulfill their obligation under this new legislation.

While the AODA applies not only to employment, it does create an obligation for employers to train their staff on accessibility laws, identify and remove barriers for people with disabilities as well as create new employment practices for the hiring and retention of people with disabilities in the workplace and new policies for accommodation and return-to-work.

While there is currently no federal equivalent to the AODA, such legislation will be enacted in the future. In fact Employment and Social Development Canada, under Minister Carla Qualtrough, Minister of Sport and Persons with Disabilities is now conducting a national consultation on a new Federal Disability Act. Further information on the process is available online: http://www.esdc.gc.ca/en/consultations/disability/legislation/index.page.

To illustrate this further, Barrier-Free Canada has been fervently advocating for a Federal Disability Act. The idea is to create federal legislation to complement the existing and future provincial disability legislation in order to make all of Canada barrier-free for persons with disabilities. Visit the Barrier-Free Canada website for more information: http://barrierfreecanada.org/home/.

At this time, Manitoba is the only province to have equivalent legislation to the AODA which is entitled Accessibility for Manitobans Act (AMA). Again, it would not be a surprise to see further provincial and territorial disability legislation in the future. In particular, there is discussion of disability legislation or reforms in Nova Scotia, British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Newfoundland. Read about Nova Scotia’s Accessibility Legislation here: http://novascotia.ca/coms/accessibility/ and British Columbia’s Accessibility 2024 Legislation: http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/governments/about-the-bc-government/accessibility.

5.2.3 Undue hardship

Your employer can refuse an accommodation request when it would cause undue hardship the business. Undue hardship is described as the limit past which your employer does not have the obligation to accommodate you. There is no set formula for deciding what constitutes undue hardship.

If your employer chooses to deny an accommodation request, he has the responsibility of proving that the accommodation would have caused undue hardship.

The following are some factors that human rights tribunals will look at when determining if there is undue hardship:

  • The financial cost (and maintaining a productive workplace)
  • The disruption of a collective agreement
  • The risk of problems with other employees
  • The size of the business and interchangeability of the workplace
  • The health and safety risks attached to the accommodation

The term “undue hardship” means that some amount of hardship is acceptable. It is generally accepted in law that an accommodation may place a financial burden on the employer. The cost must be more than trivial in order to be classified as undue.

Your employer, however, is not expected to put in jeopardy the survival of the business in order to accommodate you. Furthermore, there is no obligation to drastically change the workplace or create a new position (with unnecessary job duties) in order to accommodate you.

Your employer’s duty to accommodate may also be different in cases of a permanent disability versus cases of a temporary disability. In many instances, a long term accommodation is more likely to reach undue hardship than a short term accommodation. Long term accommodations are also more likely to have a larger impact on smaller employers.

5.2.4  Bona fide occupational requirement

bona fide occupational requirement is a defense for a refusal to accommodate. Your employer can refuse to accommodate you when there is a valid reason to do so due to a necessary measure put in place to carry out the duties of the specific job for efficiency, economical or safety purposes. In addition, the refusal must be done honestly and in good faith. Essentially, your employer needs to demonstrate:

  • That the perceived discriminatory measure was adopted for purposes rationally connected to the fulfillment of the work in question;
  • That your employer sincerely believed that the measure was necessary for the fulfillment of the work in question; and
  • That the measure is, in fact, reasonably necessary to fulfill the work in question as it would be impossible to accommodate you without imposing undue hardship on himself.

To illustrate this concept, the following are a few examples of what could be considered a bona fide occupational requirement:

  • Not employing an epileptic person for a driving position
  • Visual acuity standards for police work
  • Fitness assessment for paramedic work
  •     IS THERE SOMETHING MISSING HERE — CHECK THE FILE

While these are examples in which a bona fide occupational requirement may arise, there is always a chance that the employer is obligated to accommodate the employee in another position.

While this test was decided based on the Ontario Human Rights Code, it has been accepted by federal case law as well.

5.3  Rights and Obligations

All parties in the employment relationship have the responsibility to participate in finding a solution in order to accommodate the employee.

5.3.1  Employee

As an employee, you have the obligation to inform your employer of any accommodations you may need due to a disability. Specifically, you must inform your employer of the nature of the disability and of any and all functional limitations as well as potential issues that may arise due to your disability (see section on disclosure).

Functional limitations are described as limitations you may have that are caused by your disability which impede on your ability to perform certain tasks.

You may be obligated to cooperate in undergoing assessments in order to support your request because your employer is entitled to receive accurate and relevant information in regards to your disability. Should you refuse to submit to an assessment where the employer is within his rights to request one, it may be found that he has fulfilled his duty to accommodate you.

You must bear in mind that the accommodation must not be perfect but reasonable. Consequently, when your employer and union make a reasonable accommodation proposal, you have the obligation to accept it and facilitate its implementation. Should you choose to refuse an accommodation proposal, you must provide an explanation for the reasons of your refusal and it may be found that the employer has fulfilled his duty.

In obtaining your accommodation, circumstance may arise where you become obligated to accept a lower rate of pay, retraining or temporary work.

When an accommodation is put into place, it is your responsibility to inform your employer should there be changes in your functional limitations or if the accommodation is not working as the parties intended. If you do not do so, there is no way to find a better solution and your employer will likely not be held liable.

If you feel you are being discriminated against in the workplace, and you bring forth a claim on this basis, it will be your responsibility to demonstrate before a human rights tribunal that you were, in fact, a victim of discrimination based on a prohibited ground.

5.3.2  Employer

While the employee’s participation in the accommodation process is necessary, as the employer, you are the one who is responsible for finding a suitable way to accommodate your employee.

Among other things, you have the obligation to:

  • Accept an accommodation request in good faith
  • Actively search for an acceptable accommodation in a timely manner
  • Maintain confidentially
  • Explain clearly to your employee why you cannot provide the accommodation, if such is the case

While you have the right to request relevant information about your employee’s disability, you should limit requests for information to what is relevant in assessing your employee’s accommodation needs, you have the right to request a functional abilities assessment in order to properly discharge yourself of your obligations. This may be less evident when it comes to mental health disabilities or substance addictions. As an employer, you have the right to have the employee examined by your own medical professional in order to assess their accommodation needs and also to examine the amount of hardship that might be placed on you in accommodating your employee.

When you have a reasonable and legitimate concern in respects to medical evidence provided to you by a disabled employee, you have the right to request further and better evidence in order to make an informed decision.

If an employee brings forth a human rights complaint of discrimination based on a prohibited ground and it is found to have a basis in law, it is your responsibility to demonstrate that either (1) the accommodation placed an undue hardship on you; or (2) there was a bona fide occupational requirement which allowed you to refuse to accommodate the employee.

Finally, in general, as an employer, you now have a positive obligation to eliminate discriminatory barriers, policies or behavior in the workplace by implementing accommodation in policies and practices up to the point of undue hardship.

5.3.3 Union

It is established in law that a union has the same obligation as an employer to actively find a reasonable accommodation for a disabled employee. If this is not done, the union may also be held liable in a discrimination complaint.

6  Losing your job

6.1 When can an employer terminate your employment?

6.1.1 General principles

If you are a non-unionized employee, your employer may terminate your indefinite employment at any moment by giving you reasonable notice or payment in lieu of notice. Generally speaking, “reasonable notice” is calculated based on a series of factors that represent the amount of time it would take you to find a new – but similar – position in a new workplace. A payment in lieu of notice is an alternative in the form of a payment representing your salary for the reasonable notice period.

If the employer has just cause to terminate your employment, he does not have the duty to give reasonable notice. The following are examples of circumstances where your employer could potentially terminate your employment for “just cause”:

  • Insubordination
  • Incompetence
  • Dishonesty
  • Harassment
  • Break of a fiduciary obligation
  • Criminal accusations

In any case, to terminate your employment for “just cause”, your employer must meet a very high burden of proof.

6.1.2  Human Rights and Frustration of Employment Contract

Your employer has an obligation to act in good faith when terminating your employment. This means that he cannot do so based on a prohibited ground of discrimination as mentioned in previous sections. However, there are exceptions to this general rule.

For example, your employer has the right to terminate your employment where the employment contract has been frustrated. This occurs when the employee is unable to perform the essential duties of the employment contract even when he or she is being accommodated by the employer to the point of undue hardship. This does not necessarily mean that you, as an employee, are at fault (i.e. having a permanent disability) but is often linked to the effect of your incapacity to execute the employment contract on the employer’s productivity.

To be more specific, current case law establishes that in order for your employer to terminate your employment, there must be evidence showing that:

  • You are unable to meet the job requirements;
  • Medical evidence shows that there is no likely chance of improvement in the future;
  • No further accommodation was possible without imposing undue hardship.

It is also apparent in case law that employees with permanent or long-term disabilities (such as chronic pain illnesses or mental health disabilities which often lead to recurring and excessive absenteeism) – especially those who do not require a one-time accommodation – are the most at risk of having their employment terminated due to contact frustration.

In a unionized setting, the governing principles may be a bit different. Your collective agreement will generally provide you with the information needed surrounding a termination. In addition, you should speak to your union representative to see what options may be available to you!

In any of the above situations, your employer has the obligation to inform you if you are at risk of losing your employment. If your employer does not do so, your termination may be nullified.

6.2 What are the employee’s rights after losing their employment?

As mentioned, if you believe that the termination of your employment was done on a discriminatory basis, you have the rights to file a complaint with the Human Rights Commission that is governing in your jurisdiction.

7 Filing a complaint with the Canadian Human Rights Commission

7.1 Overview

First and foremost, filing a complaint at the Canadian Human Rights Commission should be your last resort. You should insure that you have exhausted all other possible avenues before filing a human rights complaint. For example, have you spoken to your employer or union representative about possible solutions to your human rights issue?

The reason filing a complaint should be your last resort is that the process can be very demanding, long in duration and can also be very costly. In many cases, the outcome may not be worth the time, effort and money. For this reason, you should pursue complaints that are meritorious. You should seek legal advice in order to find out if your case has merit. You can contact the Human Rights Legal Support Centre for help (http://www.hrlsc.on.ca/en/home).

7.2  The process

7.2.1  Filing a complaint

Before filing a formal complaint, you should insure that you are able to complain. Your complaint must be (1) against your employer or a service provider, (2) based on a discriminatory practice, and (3) related to a ground of discrimination found in the Canadian Human Rights Code (see  the Complaint Assessment Tool: http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/eng/content/complaint-assessment-tool).

As mentioned above, you must also ensure that you are a federally regulated employee to file a complaint at the Canadian Human Rights Commission (see section: What type of employee are you?). ASK JASON: I NEED TO LINK THIS

Finally, you only have 1 year (12 months) from the moment of the alleged discriminatory action to file your complaint.

Your complaint must be mailed to:

Canadian Human Rights Commission

344 Slater Street, 8th floor

Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1E1

or faxed to (613) 996-9661. Please note that you cannot send your complaint form electronically!

7.2.2  After you’ve filed your complaint

Once you file a complaint against your employer, they will be informed by the Commission. It is illegal for your employer to retaliate against you in the workplace for filing a human rights complaint.

The Commission will then decide if they will deal with your complaint. There are certain reasons the Commission may choose not to deal with your complaint. For example, if they do not have jurisdiction, if your issue is not linked to a protected grounds of discrimination, etc. (see http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/eng/content/what-can-i-expect).

If the Commission pursues your complaint, you and your employer may be offered to mediate your issue. This is a voluntary step. If this avenue is attempted and successful, or not attempted at all, your complaint will then be investigated by the Commission.

Following the investigation, the Commission will render a decision. They will either dismiss your complaint, send you to conciliation or refer it to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. Conciliation is similar to mediation and is another attempt to solve the issue before referring it to the Tribunal.

7.2.3  The Tribunal’s decision

There is a chance that your matter is referred to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal. The Tribunal will render a decision on the merit of your case. They will either find that there was no discrimination and dismiss your complaint OR find that there was discrimination. In the latter case, the Tribunal may impose a corrective measure.

7.3  What Should You Expect?

7.3.1  Corrective measures

In terms of monetary compensation, the Tribunal can award you total compensation for your losses, as well as a maximum of $20 000 for pain and suffering and $20 000 for willful discrimination. They can also order that your employer give you your job back or that your employer create and implement human rights policies in the workplace.

7.3.2  Others implications

It is very important to bear in mind that this is a very long process and if your case is referred to the Tribunal, it can take several years to be heard.

Furthermore, filing a complaint does not cost any money up front but if you choose to seek independent legal advice to pursue your complaint, it can become very costly.

Should you choose not to seek legal advice, you risk making mistakes and not adequately presenting your case to the adjudicator which can have a detrimental impact on your chances of a successful outcome. While adjudicators do recognize the legal barriers faced by unrepresented parties, they cannot legally go as far as to help you prove your case. It’s important to have relevant and concrete evidence to establish your side of the story. It is also important that you familiarize yourself further with the legal process.

Finally, the above information and advice is important in order to be able to face the human rights complaint process with realistic expectations.

8  Information for Human Rights Commissions in Canada

8.1 Canada (Federal)

Canadian Human Rights Commission
344 Slater Street, 8th Floor
Ottawa, Ontario K1A 1E1

Toll Free: 1 (888) 214-1090
TTY: 1 (888) 643-3304
Fax: (613) 996-9661

Websitehttp://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/index.html

Office hours:
Monday to Friday, 8:00 am to 8:00 pm (Eastern Time)

8.2  Provinces

Alberta Human Rights Commission

Northern Regional Office

800 – 10405 Jasper Avenue NW
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4R7

Phone
: (780) 427-7661
Toll Free (all offices)1 (800) 232-7215
Fax: (780) 427-6013
TTY: (780) 427-1597
Office hours: 8:15 am to 4:30 pm

Southern Regional Office
200 J.J. Bowlen Building
620 – 7 Avenue SW
Calgary, Alberta T2P 0Y8

Phone: (403) 297-6571
Toll Free (all offices): 1 (800) 232-7215
Fax: (403) 297-6567TTY(403) 297-5639

Office hours: 8:15 am to 4:30 pm
E-mailhumanrights@gov.ab.ca
Websitehttp://www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca/

British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal
1170 – 605 Robson Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5J3

Phone: (604) 775-2000
Toll Free: 1 (888) 440-8844
Fax: (604) 775-2020
TTY: (604) 775-2021

Office hours: Monday to Friday, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
EmailBCHumanRightsTribunal@gov.bc.ca
Websitehttp://www.bchrt.bc.ca/

Manitoba Human Rights Commission

Winnipeg Office
700-175 Hargrave Street
Winnipeg, MB R3C 3R8

Phone
: (204) 945-3007
Fax: (204) 945-1292

Brandon Office
341-340 Ninth Street
Brandon, MB R7A 6C2

Phone
: (204) 726-6261
Fax: (204) 726-6035
Toll Free: 1 (888) 884-8681
TTY: 1 (888) 897-2811
Emailhrc@gov.mb.ca
Websitehttp://www.manitobahumanrights.ca/

New Brunswick Human Rights Commission
Barry House
PO Box 6000
Fredericton, NB E3B 5H1

Phone: (506) 453-2301
Toll Free: 1 (888) 471-2233
Fax: (506) 453-2653
TTY: (506) 453-2911

Office hours: Monday to Friday: 8:15 am to 4:30 pm
Emailhrc.cdp@gnb.ca
Website: http://www.gnb.ca/hrc-cdp/index-e.asp

Newfoundland and Labrador Human Rights Commission

The Beothuk Building
21 Crosbie Place
PO Box 8700
St. John’s, NL A1B 4J6

Phone: (709) 729-2709
Toll Free: 1 (800) 563-5808
Fax: (709) 729-0790

E-mail: humanrights@gov.nl.ca
Websitehttp://www.justice.gov.nl.ca/hrc/index.html


Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission
Head Office
5657 Spring Garden Road
Park Lane Terrace
Halifax, NS B3J 1H1
3rd Floor, Suite 305

Phone: (902) 424-4111
Toll Free (all offices): 1 (877) 269-7699
Fax: (902) 424-0596
TTY: Services available via 711

E-mailhrcinquiries@novascotia.ca
Websitehttps://humanrights.novascotia.ca/
Other office locations: Sydney and Digby

Ontario Human Rights Commission
180 Dundas Street West, 9th Floor
Toronto, ON M7A 2R9

Phone: (416) 326-9511
Toll Free: 1 (800) 387-9080
TTY (Local): (416) 326-0603
TTY (Toll Free): 1 (800) 308-5561
E-mailinfo@ohrc.on.ca
Websitehttp://www.ohrc.on.ca/

Also see Human Rights Legal Support Centre [CHECK, IS THIS THE ADDRESS BELOW FOR HUMAN RIGHTS LEGAL SUPPORT CENTRE? A BIT CONFUSING]
180 Dundas Street West, 8th Floor
Toronto, ON M7A 0A1

Phone: (416) 597-4900
Toll Free: 1 (866) 625-5179
TTY: (416) 597-4903
TTY Toll Free: 1 (866) 612-8627
Websitewww.hrlsc.on.ca

Quebec

Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse
Quebec Head Office
360, Saint-Jacques St, 2nd floor
Montréal (Québec) H2Y 1P5

Access for disabled persons: 361, Notre-Dame St, West

Phone: (514) 873-5146
Toll Free: 1 (800) 361-6477
Fax: (514) 873-6032

Office hours: Monday to Friday 8:30 am to noon and 1:00 pm to 4:30 pm

E-mailaccueil@cdpdj.qc.ca
Website: http://www.cdpdj.qc.ca/en/Pages/default.aspx

Other office locations
: Québec, Saguenay, Saint-Jerome, Sept-Iles, Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Val-d’Or

Prince Edward Island Human Rights Commission
53 Water Street
PO Box 2000
Charlottetown PE C1A 7N8

Phone: (902) 368-4180
Toll Free: 1 (800) 237-5031
Fax: (902) 368-4236

Email: contact@peihumanrights.ca
Websitehttp://www.gov.pe.ca/humanrights/

Saskatchewan Human Rights Commission
Suite 816, Sturdy Stone Building
122-3rd Avenue North
Saskatoon, SK S7K 2H6

Phone:  (306) 933-5952
Toll Free:  1 (800) 667-9249
Fax:  (306) 933-7863

E-mail:
  shrc@gov.sk.ca
Websitehttp://saskatchewanhumanrights.ca/

8.3 Territories

Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission

Main Floor, Laing Building, 5003 49th street
Yellowknife, NT X1A 2L9

Phone: (867) 669-5575
Toll Free: 1 (888) 669-5575
Fax: (867) 873-0357

E-mailinfo@nwthumanrights.ca
Websitehttp://nwthumanrights.ca/

Office hours: Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 5:00 pm

Nunavut Human Rights Tribunal
PO Box 15Coral Harbour, NU X0C 0C0

Toll-Free Telephone
: 1 (866) 413-6478
Toll Free Fax: 1 (888) 220-1011
E-mailnunavuthumanrights@gov.nu.ca
Websitehttp://www.nhrt.ca/english/home

Office hours:

April to October: 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Central Standard Time
November to March: 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time

Note: Coral Harbour, NU does not change time

Yukon Human Rights Commission
101-9010 Quartz Road
Whitehorse, YT Y1A 2Z5

Phone:
 (867) 667-6226
Toll Free: 1 (800) 661-0535
Fax: (867) 667-2662

E-mail:
 humanrights@yhrc.yk.ca
Websitehttp://www.yhrc.yk.ca/
Office hours: Monday to Friday 8:30 am to 4:30 pm, except on Tuesdays when we are closed to the public from 8:30 to noon.

9 Sources Consulted

9.1 Articles

Brock University, “Disclosure”, online: <https://brocku.ca/career-services/bridge-to-success/students/disclosure>.

Canadian Human Rights Commission & Minister of Public Works and Government Services, “A Place for All: A Guide to Creating an Inclusive Workplace”, online: <http://www.chrc-ccdp.ca/sites/default/files/aplaceforall_1.pdf>.

Government of Canada, “Duty to Accommodate: A General Process for Managers” (November 2011), online: <http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/psm-fpfm/ve/dee/dorf-eng.asp>.

Howard A. Levitt, “The Law of Dismissal in Canada, Third Edition” (December 2003) Canada Law Book.

James D’Andrea, “Illness and Disability in the Workplace: How to Navigate Through the Legal Minefield” (May 2005), Canada Law Book.

Michael Lynk, “The Duty to Accommodate in the Canadian Workplace: Leading Principles and Recent Case” (2008), online: <http://ofl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2008.06.21-Report-DutytoAccommodate.pdf>.

Phyllis Gordon, “A Federal Disability Act: Opportunities and Challenges. A Paper Commissioned by the Council of Canadians with Disabilities and the Canadian Association for Community Living” (2006), online: <http://www.ccdonline.ca/en/socialpolicy/fda/1006#II>.

Richard B. Johnson, “Your Legal Rights and Responsibilities around Disclosure” Transition Magazine (Spring 2016).

9.2 Websites

Barrier-Free Canada. Online: <http://barrierfreecanada.org/home/>.

Canadian Human Rights Commission. Online: <http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/index.html>.

Human Rights Legal Support Centre. Online: <http://www.hrlsc.on.ca/en/home>.

Accessibility Ontario. Online: <http://www.accessontario.com>.

AODA Alliance. Online: < http://www.aodaalliance.org/>.

9.3  Case Law

Andrews v Law Society of British Columbia, [1989] 1 SCR 143.

British Columbia (Public Service Employee Relations Commission) v BCGEU, [1999] 3 SCR 3 (Meiorin).

British Columbia (Superintendent of Motor Vehicles) v British Columbia (Council of Human Rights, [1999] 3 SCR 868 (Grismer)

Byers Transport Ltd v Teamsters, Local 213 (2002), 68 CLAS 316.

Canadian Pacific Ltd and BMWE (1996), 57 LAC (4th) 129 (MG Picher).

Central Alberta Dairy Pool v Alberta (Human Rights Commission), [1990] 2 SCR 489.

GSW Heating Products Co and USWA (1996), 56 .AC (4th) 249 (Barrett).

Guibord v. The Queen (1996), 97 CLLC 230-019 (FCTD).

Holmes v Attorney General of Canada (1997), 130 FTR 251.

Hydro-Québec v Syndicat des employées de techniques professionnelles et de bureau d’Hydro-Québec. Section locale 2000 (SCFP-FTQ), 2008 SCC 43, [2008] 2 SCR 561.

O’Malley v Simpson-Sears, [1985] 2 SCR 536.

Ontario (Human Rights Commission) v Etobicoke (Borough), [1982] 1 SCR 202.

Re Alcan Smelters and Chemicals Ltd (1996), 55 LAC (4th) 261 (Hope).

Re Calgary District Hospital Group (1995), 41 LAC (4th) 319.

Re Greater Niagara General Hospital (1995), 50 L.A.C. (4th) 34.

Renaud v Central Okanagan School District No. 23, [1992] 2 SCR 970.

Society of Ontario Hydro Professional & Administrative Employees v Ontario Hydro, [1993] 3 SCR 327.

TCC Bottling Ltd and RWDSU, Local 1065 (1993), 32 LAC (4th) 73 (Christie).

9.4  Legislation

Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, SO 2005, c 11.

Canada Labour Code, RSC 1985, c L-2.

Canadian Human Rights Act, RSC 1985, c H-6.

Constitution Act, 1982, 30 & 31 Victoria, c 3 (UK), s. 91, 92.

Employment Equity Act, SC 1995, c 44.

This exposition on the duty to accommodate was completed by Samantha Dubord as part of a Human Rights/Social Justice Internship with the National Educational Association of Disabled Students offered by Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne & Yazbeck LLP. Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne & Yazbeck LLP is a firm located in Ottawa, Ontario, specializing particularly in labour, employment and human rights law. Samantha will be completing her articles with the firm beginning in July 2017.

[1] A re-bundled job generally means that the employer reorganizes or restructures job duties (without undue hardship) in order to accommodate the employee. This is generally a viable option in a larger workplace with many different positions and job duties.

For a version of this document in Adobe PDF, please click below:
The-Duty-to-Accommodate_Dubord
For a copy of Adobe PDF reader, please click below:
https://get.adobe.com/reader/

For an audio version of this file, please click below:
Legal Rights Abstract

 

L’OBLIGATION D’ADAPTATION

1        Quel type d’employé êtes-vous?

1.1     Aperçu

1.2     Comment faire pour savoir si vous êtes un employé sous réglementation fédérale?

2        Introduction à la législation sur les droits de la personne

2.1      La législation sur les droits de la personne au Canada

2.2      La législation pertinente

2.2.1    La Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne

2.2.2    La Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi 

2.3       Qu’est‑ce que la discrimination?

2.4       Qu’est‑ce qu’une déficience?

3          Divulgation d’une déficience

3.1       Quand êtes-vous juridiquement obligé de divulguer votre déficience?

3.2       Quelle est l’étendue des renseignements que vous devez divulguer?

3.3       À qui devriez-vous divulguer votre déficience?

3.4       Obligation de l’employeur concernant la protection des renseignements personnels

4          Votre droit à l’égalité des chances en matière d’emploi 

5          Obligation d’adaptation de l’employeur

5.1       Définition de l’obligation d’adaptation

5.2       Quels sont les paramètres de l’obligation d’adaptation?

5.2.1    Quand l’obligation d’adaptation entre-t-elle en jeu?

5.2.2    Adaptation

5.2.3    Contrainte excessive

5.2.4     Exigence professionnelle justifiée

5.3        Droits et obligations

5.3.1      Employé

5.3.2      Employeur

5.3.3      Syndicat

6            La perte de votre emploi

6.1         Quand un employeur peut-il mettre fin à votre emploi?

6.1.1      Principes généraux

6.1.2      Les droits de la personne et l’inexécution du contrat de travail

6.2         Quels sont les droits de l’employé après la perte de son emploi?

7            Déposer une plainte auprès de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne

7.1         Aperçu

7.2         Le processus

7.2.1      Dépôt d’une plainte

7.2.2      Une fois que vous aurez déposé votre plainte

7.2.3      Décision du Tribunal

7.3         À quoi devriez-vous vous attendre?

7.3.1      Mesures correctives

7.3.2      Autres conséquences

8            Renseignements sur les commissions des droits de la personne du Canada

8.1         Canada (fédéral)

8.2         Provinces

8.3         Territoires

9            Sources consultées

9.1         Articles

9.2         Sites Web

9.3         Jurisprudence

9.4         Lois

 

L’OBLIGATION D’ADAPTATION

PAR SAMANTHA DUBORD

Les informations qui suivent ne doivent pas être considérées comme un avis juridique. Ne vous fiez pas à ces renseignements comme solution de rechange à l’obtention de conseils d’un professionnel du droit. Si vous avez des questions d’ordre juridique, vous devriez consulter un représentant juridique.

1    Quel type d’employé êtes-vous?

1.1   Aperçu

Le partage constitutionnel des pouvoirs entre les gouvernements fédéral et provinciaux au Canada détermine quel ordre de gouvernement – fédéral ou provincial – peut prendre des mesures ou adopter des lois dans certains domaines de la vie au Canada. Cette distinction devient importante lorsque vous déposez une plainte relative aux droits de la personne. Dans votre cas, il est important de savoir à quelle compétence il faut adresser une plainte. Cela dépendra du type d’employé que vous êtes, c’est-à-dire si vous êtes soumis à la réglementation fédérale ou provinciale.

1.2   Comment faire pour savoir si vous êtes un employé sous réglementation fédérale?

Il est courant de présumer que la réglementation quotidienne des entreprises et des contrats de travail au sein de ces entreprises est du ressort des provinces. C’est bel et bien le cas sauf lorsqu’il s’agit d’une entreprise fédérale. Cela signifie que l’entreprise, en raison de sa nature, relève d’un champ de compétence attribué au gouvernement fédéral dans la Constitution. Pour cette raison, seulement certains secteurs d’emploi au Canada sont de compétence fédérale.

Pour savoir si vous êtes un employé sous réglementation fédérale, la nature principale du travail que vous faites doit être fonctionnellement reliée à l’entreprise fédérale.

Suivent quelques exemples clés d’entreprises fédérales. Travaillez-vous pour…

  • le gouvernement fédéral?
  • une banque?
  • une compagnie de transport (aérien, maritime, ferroviaire, d’autocars ou de camionnage) dont l’activité s’étend au‑delà des limites d’une province?
  • une compagnie de télécommunications (comme Bell ou Rogers)?
  • une station de radiodiffusion ou de télédiffusion?
  • une compagnie de téléphone (avec des connexions entre les provinces ou qui fait partie d’une compagnie fonctionnant continuellement à l’extérieur d’une province)?
  • un fournisseur de services Internet?
  • un bureau de poste?
  • une centrale nucléaire?

Ce ne sont là que des indications, mais si vous avez répondu oui à n’importe quelle des questions ci‑dessus, il y a de fortes chances que vous êtes un employé sous réglementation fédérale.

CONSEIL : Parlez à votre employeur ou demandez un avis juridique si vous ne savez pas encore avec certitude si vous êtes un employé fédéral avant de déposer une plainte relative aux droits de la personne.

Les renseignements dans ce site Web s’appliquent de façon précise aux employés et employeurs sous réglementation fédérale. Si vous êtes un employé fédéral, vous devez déposer une plainte relative aux droits de la personne auprès de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne. Si vous êtes un employé réglementé par une province ou un territoire, vous devriez consulter les ressources disponibles dans votre province ou territoire (voir ci‑dessous) qui pourraient vous être plus utiles et porter davantage sur vos préoccupations particulières.

2     Introduction à la législation sur les droits de la personne

2.1    La législation sur les droits de la personne au Canada

Suit une liste des textes législatifs qui régissent les droits de la personne dans leur province ou territoire respectif :

Consultez la section « Quel type d’employé êtes-vous? » pour déterminer où vous devriez commencer votre recherche!

2.2     La législation pertinente

Nous allons examiner pour vous la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne et la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi qui s’appliquent toutes les deux au secteur fédéral de l’emploi au Canada.

2.2.1   La Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne

La législation sur les droits de la personne a été créée pour reconnaître la dignité et la valeur de tous les Canadiens et pour veiller à ce que tous soient traités de façon égale et puissent être des membres actifs de la société. Cela est vrai tant pour la législation provinciale que pour la législation fédérale, notamment pour la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne. Ce texte législatif instaure des mécanismes pour veiller à ce que les droits de tous soient protégés. La législation est réparatoire et non pas punitive.

En ce qui concerne le droit de l’emploi et du travail, la Loi reconnaît que tous les employés faisant partie d’une catégorie protégée contre la discrimination devraient bénéficier de mesures d’adaptation, à moins que celles-ci imposent une contrainte excessive à l’employeur.

Si l’on vous refuse une mesure d’adaptation et que vous faites partie d’une catégorie de personnes protégées contre la discrimination, vous pouvez déposer une plainte auprès de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne concernant tout comportement discriminatoire qui se produit 1) pendant l’entrevue et le processus de présélection, 2) pendant la relation d’emploi et 3) à la cessation d’emploi.

Note importante : Veuillez noter que vous devez déposer une plainte dans un délai d’un (1) an suivant la conduite discriminatoire alléguée.

2.2.2   La Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi

La Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi a pour but de supprimer l’inégalité pour des raisons qui ne sont pas reliées à la capacité d’exercer des fonctions dans un milieu de travail fédéral. Ce texte législatif explique que l’égalité ne consiste pas seulement à traiter toutes les personnes de façon identique, mais qu’elle exige parfois des mesures spéciales.

La Loi crée pour votre employeur l’obligation de déterminer et de supprimer les obstacles dans le milieu de travail et de mettre en place de nouvelles politiques, pratiques et adaptations pour s’assurer que tous les groupes désignés soient représentés dans le milieu de travail. Votre employeur doit faire une analyse du milieu de travail pour évaluer la représentation de ces groupes et doit fixer des buts et agir de manière à accroître leur représentation lorsque cela est nécessaire.

2.3    Qu’est‑ce que la discrimination?

La discrimination est une distinction, fondée sur des caractéristiques personnelles, qui fait en sorte qu’une personne ou un groupe est désavantagé ou se voit refuser un avantage dont d’autres bénéficient. La Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne interdit à votre employeur de commettre un acte discriminatoire à votre égard se fondant sur 11 motifs précisés.

Ces motifs de distinction illicite sont ceux qui se fondent sur la race, l’origine nationale ou ethnique, la couleur, la religion, l’âge, le sexe, l’orientation sexuelle, l’état matrimonial, la situation de famille, la déficience et l’état de personne graciée. Aux fins qui vous intéressent, nous n’examinerons que la discrimination fondée sur la déficience. Il convient de faire remarquer que les actes discriminatoires à votre égard peuvent comprendre des actes fondés sur plusieurs motifs à la fois.

La discrimination est analysée uniquement du point de vue de l’effet de la Loi sur vous en tant qu’employé, et non pas relativement à l’intention de votre employeur. La discrimination inclut aussi les représailles subies par la personne qui dépose une plainte relative aux droits de la personne pour une question liée à la déficience.

2.4    Qu’est‑ce qu’une déficience?

La Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne stipule qu’une déficience inclut les déficiences physiques ou mentales, qu’elles soient présentes ou passées, ainsi que la dépendance envers l’alcool ou la drogue.

Dans la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi, le terme est défini en décrivant les personnes handicapées comme des personnes qui « ont une déficience durable ou récurrente soit de leurs capacités physiques, mentales ou sensorielles, soit d’ordre psychiatrique ou en matière d’apprentissage ». La déficience fait en sorte que la personne se sent désavantagée, et elle est aussi susceptible d’amener l’employeur à déterminer que la personne est désavantagée dans le milieu de travail.

Il convient de faire remarquer que la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi ne traite pas des adaptations pour des déficiences de courte durée, mais que la Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne le fait.

Le terme a aussi été défini dans bien des cas juridiques et a fait l’objet d’une interprétation large. Suivent quelques exemples de déficiences reconnues :

  • cécité et déficience visuelle grave;
  • surdité et déficience auditive grave;
  • trouble de la parole;
  • déficience motrice, comme la paraplégie, la quadriplégie, l’amputation, les troubles neurologiques qui peuvent affecter la mobilité, comme la sclérose en plaques, etc.;
  • douleur chronique, comme l’arthrite, les migraines, les maux de dos, etc.;
  • dépendances, par exemple, à l’alcool ou aux drogues, etc.;
  • troubles d’apprentissage, comme le trouble d’hyperactivité avec déficit de l’attention (THADA), la dyslexie, etc.;
  • maladies ou troubles chroniques, comme le diabète, l’asthme, le cancer, etc.;
  • troubles psychiatriques, comme la dépression, la schizophrénie, etc.;
  • hypersensibilités environnementales;
  • déficiences développementales, comme l’autisme, le syndrome de Down, etc.

3    Divulgation d’une déficience

3.1   Quand êtes-vous juridiquement obligé de divulguer votre déficience?

Si vous avez une déficience visible, la divulgation de votre déficience à votre employeur pourrait ne pas être une préoccupation pour vous. Toutefois, vous pourriez quand même devoir divulguer des renseignements concernant votre déficience visible si vous avez besoin d’une mesure d’adaptation particulière pour des limitations fonctionnelles qui ne seraient pas évidentes pour votre employeur.

En plus, dans bien des cas où la déficience n’est pas visible, vous n’avez pas l’obligation juridique d’en informer votre employeur. Par contre, dans certains cas, la divulgation de votre déficience devient une obligation juridique.

Premièrement, vous devez divulguer une déficience lorsque vous avez besoin d’une adaptation dans le milieu de travail, pendant le processus d’entrevue ou à tout autre moment pour une raison liée à votre emploi ou au processus de demande d’emploi, parce qu’advenant une plainte relative aux droits de la personne, l’employeur ne peut pas être tenu responsable s’il n’était pas au courant de l’existence de cette déficience. En fin de compte, ce que votre employeur ou les personnes travaillant pour lui dans les domaines de l’embauche ou de la gestion des ressources humaines ne savent pas ne peut pas leur être reproché.

Deuxièmement, vous devez divulguer votre déficience si elle est susceptible d’influer sur votre rendement au travail, votre assiduité ou votre capacité d’effectuer les tâches essentielles du poste. De manière générale, si vous choisissez de ne pas divulguer votre déficience, il est important que vous soyez capable de remplir toutes les tâches essentielles du poste avant de l’accepter.

Enfin, si votre déficience crée des risques pour votre santé ou votre sécurité ou celle de vos collègues de travail, vous êtes également juridiquement obligé d’en informer votre employeur.

3.2   Quelle est l’étendue des renseignements que vous devez divulguer?

Lorsque vous divulguez votre déficience à votre employeur, vous avez l’obligation de donner suffisamment de renseignements concernant votre déficience pour justifier votre demande de mesures d’adaptation et pour permettre à votre employeur de remplir convenablement et promptement son obligation d’adaptation.

Vous n’êtes aucunement obligé de révéler à votre employeur le diagnostic exact de votre déficience, mais vous devez décrire la nature de l’incapacité et toute limitation fonctionnelle qui pourrait nuire à votre capacité de remplir les fonctions de votre poste. Vos limitations fonctionnelles devraient être évaluées par un professionnel de la santé et, dans certains cas limités, votre employeur pourrait avoir le droit de demander plus de renseignements ou d’évaluations.

Si votre déficience nuit à votre travail et que vous choisissez de ne pas coopérer ou de ne pas partager les renseignements pertinents concernant votre déficience, votre employeur pourrait avoir rempli son obligation d’adaptation et pourrait avoir le droit de vous congédier.

En plus de ce qui précède, vous avez l’obligation d’informer votre employeur lorsqu’une adaptation ne fonctionne pas convenablement et que vous avez besoin de mesures d’adaptation additionnelles ou différentes. Votre employeur ne fera pas preuve de discrimination contre vous s’il n’est pas mis au courant d’autres problèmes liés à votre incapacité qui ont une incidence directe sur votre rendement et votre participation entière dans le milieu de travail.

3.3   À qui devriez-vous divulguer votre déficience?

Mises à part vos obligations juridiques indiquées ci‑dessus, vous avez la prérogative de décider quels renseignements concernant votre déficience vous choisissez de partager et à qui vous choisissez d’en parler. Toutefois, il est évident que ce n’est pas tout le monde qui peut vous aider en ce qui concerne les mesures d’adaptation. Vous devriez déterminer le plus tôt possible qui est en mesure de vous aider à obtenir l’adaptation demandée. Par exemple, selon la compagnie, votre gestionnaire ou superviseur pourrait être cette personne, ou il pourrait s’agir du personnel du service des ressources humaines.

Si vous êtes un employé syndiqué, un bon point de départ consiste à discuter avec votre représentant syndical des mesures que vous devriez prendre ou de la bonne personne ou du bon bureau auquel vous devriez donner des renseignements sur votre déficience.

Si vous n’êtes pas un employé syndiqué, vous pourriez avoir à vous renseigner vous-même. La personne à laquelle il convient de parler pourrait différer selon la taille de l’entreprise ou du milieu de travail. Par exemple, vous pourriez divulguer votre déficience à la personne qui vous fait passer votre entrevue initiale, à votre superviseur au moment où vous commencez à travailler ou à un représentant des ressources humaines (RH) s’il y a un service des RH dans l’entreprise (ce qui est habituellement le cas chez les grands employeurs).

3.4   Obligation de l’employeur concernant la protection des renseignements personnels

Lorsque vous informez votre employeur d’une déficience, la compagnie a l’obligation juridique de maintenir la confidentialité de ces renseignements aux termes de la Loi sur la protection des renseignements personnels. Les renseignements nécessaires peuvent être communiqués aux personnes qui ont besoin de connaître votre déficience et vos limitations (par exemple, votre superviseur).

Vous avez le droit de poser des questions à votre employeur concernant la collecte et l’utilisation des renseignements que vous fournissez concernant votre déficience. Vous avez aussi le droit de consulter les politiques et procédures de votre employeur sur la collecte et l’utilisation des renseignements confidentiels, si elles existent.

4    Votre droit à l’égalité des chances en matière d’emploi

Votre employeur ne peut pas agir de façon discriminatoire envers vous pour un motif de discrimination illicite pendant le processus d’embauche en vue de pourvoir un poste. La difficulté pratique dans ce cas, c’est qu’il est très difficile de déterminer, lorsqu’on ne vous offre pas un poste auquel vous avez posé votre candidature, si vous n’avez pas obtenu le poste pour des raisons valables ou si la décision se fondait sur un motif de discrimination.

Vous avez le droit de déposer une plainte relative aux droits de la personne si un employeur potentiel a fait preuve de discrimination contre vous en raison de votre déficience. Toutefois, ceci pourrait être très difficile à prouver dans de nombreux cas puisque la discrimination pendant le processus de candidature et d’entrevue n’est pas habituellement parfaitement évidente. Un exemple d’une pratique discriminatoire plus évidente pourrait consister à demander aux candidats de divulguer toute déficience dans un formulaire de demande d’emploi. Un autre exemple consisterait à vous refuser votre droit à une entrevue si vous utilisez un fauteuil roulant, en vous offrant une entrevue dans un lieu qui n’est pas physiquement accessible.

En plus, la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi oblige les employeurs fédéraux à offrir des occasions d’emploi égales à certains groupes désavantagés : 1) les personnes handicapées; 2) les femmes; 3) les Autochtones; 4) les personnes faisant partie d’autres minorités visibles. Elle offre à ces groupes une protection supplémentaire ainsi que plus de chances d’obtenir un emploi dans les secteurs privé et public fédéraux pour assurer une représentation équitable au sein du gouvernement fédéral et des organisations de tous les employeurs sous réglementation fédérale.

Enfin, comme mentionné ci‑dessus, si vous avez besoin d’une mesure d’adaptation pendant l’entrevue et le processus de demande d’emploi, vous pouvez en informer votre employeur potentiel et il aura l’obligation de prendre des mesures d’adaptation pour vous.

5   Obligation d’adaptation de l’employeur

5.1  Définition de l’obligation d’adaptation

Votre employeur a l’obligation de prendre toutes les mesures raisonnables pour supprimer une règle, un usage ou un obstacle physique dans le milieu de travail qui est une source de discrimination contre vous. Votre employeur doit s’assurer que vous êtes traité de la même façon que les autres employés. L’obligation d’adaptation exige que les employeurs déterminent et suppriment ces règles, usages ou obstacles qui ont un effet discriminatoire en instaurant d’autres règles ou usages. L’obligation d’adaptation ne s’applique qu’aux motifs de distinction illicite, dont la déficience.

L’obligation d’adaptation n’est pas absolue. Votre employeur doit prendre des mesures répondant à vos besoins dans la mesure où elles ne constituent pas une contrainte excessive. Le refus de votre employeur de prendre une mesure d’adaptation pourrait aussi être justifié par une exigence professionnelle justifiée.

5.2   Quels sont les paramètres de l’obligation d’adaptation?

Votre employeur a la responsabilité de faire des efforts sérieux et sincères lorsqu’il cherche une adaptation qui vous convient. Il ne suffit pas de faire des suppositions quant aux adaptations qui pourraient ou non être disponibles. S’il refuse de prendre des mesures d’adaptation, votre employeur doit avoir des preuves concrètes démontrant que le refus était fondé.

5.2.1 Quand l’obligation d’adaptation entre-t-elle en jeu?

Encore une fois, comme mentionné ci‑dessus, vous avez le droit de ne pas subir de discrimination à partir du début du processus de demande d’emploi et d’entrevue jusqu’à la cessation de votre emploi. L’obligation d’adaptation entre donc en jeu dès votre première interaction avec votre employeur potentiel.

Si vous avez des besoins particuliers liés à une déficience (motif de distinction illicite) qui pourraient avoir un effet sur votre travail, vous avez la responsabilité personnelle d’en informer votre employeur (voir la section sur la divulgation).

L’obligation d’adaptation peut aussi survenir pendant la relation d’emploi lorsque quelque chose vous empêche de faire votre travail dans la même mesure qu’auparavant. Par exemple, cela pourrait arriver si vous devenez handicapé ou malade ou si vous souffrez d’une dépendance, ou encore, si vous réalisez qu’une incapacité existante et non divulguée a un effet sur votre rendement au travail. Les personnes ayant une incapacité épisodique, comme la sclérose en plaques, le lupus et d’autres troubles neurologiques, pourraient être en relativement bonne santé pendant certaines périodes, puis connaître un déclin de leur santé et de leur bien-être physique qui pourrait affecter leur rendement, le lieu où elles doivent travailler (dans le milieu de travail ou à partir de leur résidence) ainsi que le nombre d’heures pendant lesquelles elles peuvent travailler. Une personne ayant une invalidité épisodique pourrait avoir besoin de mesures d’adaptation comme un horaire souple ou d’autres modalités de travail flexibles. Un employé aux prises avec un problème de santé mentale pourrait se trouver dans des circonstances semblables. Dans ces cas, votre employeur a aussi l’obligation de prendre des mesures d’adaptation pour vous avant d’envisager de mettre fin à votre emploi.

Enfin, si vous ne divulguez pas votre déficience, il se pourrait quand même que votre employeur ait l’obligation d’entreprendre le processus d’adaptation pour déterminer si vous avez besoin d’une mesure d’adaptation dans les cas où des problèmes de rendement surviennent dans des circonstances douteuses. Cette situation peut être plus courante dans le cas d’un problème de santé mentale qui pourrait ne pas encore avoir été diagnostiqué ou qui n’est pas constamment évident. En fin de compte, si votre employeur soupçonne que vous pourriez avoir une déficience non divulguée qui influe sur votre rendement au travail, il doit agir en conséquence et de façon appropriée avant de mettre fin à votre emploi.

5.2.2 Adaptation

Une mesure d’adaptation peut prendre différentes formes. Il peut y avoir différentes adaptations pour différentes personnes et différentes déficiences. Votre employeur doit respecter le test suivant en trois étapes lorsqu’il tente de trouver un moyen raisonnable de répondre à vos besoins.

  • Pouvez-vous effectuer les tâches de votre poste dans les conditions actuelles?
  • Si ce n’est pas le cas, pourriez-vous faire votre travail si l’on modifiait vos tâches?
  • Si ce n’est pas le cas, pourriez-vous faire un autre travail existant, modifié ou reconfiguré[1]?

Les efforts qui sont faits pour trouver une adaptation doivent, au moins, être compatibles avec le type de travail pour lequel on vous a embauché. Si votre employeur est en mesure de vous offrir une adaptation appropriée, vous devez être capable d’exécuter les tâches essentielles de ce poste nouveau ou modifié. Toutefois, chaque cas doit être évalué individuellement et la détermination de l’adaptation qui convient doit demeurer fondée sur les faits.

Suivent quelques exemples de différentes mesures d’adaptation que l’on pourrait vous offrir :

  • D’autres modalités de travail (un autre poste ou des tâches modifiées dans votre poste actuel);
  • Un horaire de travail différent;
  • Des dispositions flexibles en matière de pauses;
  • Une rampe pour l’accès en fauteuil roulant;
  • Des interprètes.

Si vous êtes un employé syndiqué, vous devriez communiquer avec votre représentant syndical qui, souvent, pourra vous offrir de bons conseils sur les pratiques et politiques d’adaptation de votre employeur.

5.2.2.1  La Loi de 2005 sur l’accessibilité pour les personnes handicapées de l’Ontario (LAPHO)

En ce qui concerne les mesures d’adaptation physiques et l’accessibilité, les lois provinciales comme la LAPHO ont été créées par une initiative du secteur public pour mettre en œuvre la protection des droits des personnes handicapées prévue dans la Charte canadienne des droits et libertés ainsi que dans le Code des droits de la personne de l’Ontario. La LAPHO s’applique à tous les ordres de gouvernement, aux organismes sans but lucratif ainsi qu’aux entreprises du secteur privé en Ontario.

Cette loi, adoptée en 2005, a pour objectif de rendre l’Ontario accessible à tous d’ici 2025. Les milieux de travail provinciaux de l’Ontario doivent atteindre des objectifs généraux en matière d’accessibilité à des dates précises afin de remplir leurs obligations en vertu de cette nouvelle loi.

Bien que la LAPHO ne s’applique pas seulement à l’emploi, elle crée néanmoins une obligation pour les employeurs de former leur personnel sur les lois relatives à l’accessibilité, de déterminer et de supprimer les obstacles auxquels font face les personnes handicapées, de créer de nouvelles pratiques d’emploi pour l’embauche et le maintien en poste de personnes handicapées dans le milieu de travail et d’établir de nouvelles politiques pour l’adaptation et le retour au travail.

Bien qu’il n’existe pas actuellement d’équivalent fédéral de la LAPHO, une telle législation sera adoptée à l’avenir. En fait, Emploi et Développement social Canada, sous la direction de la ministre Carla Qualtrough, ministre des Sports et des Personnes handicapées, mène actuellement une consultation nationale sur une nouvelle loi fédérale sur les personnes handicapées. D’autres informations sur le processus se trouvent en ligne à l’adresse suivante : https://www.canada.ca/fr/emploi-developpement-social/programmes/loi-prevue-accessibilite/consultation-protocole-facultatif.html.

En outre, l’organisme Canada sans barrières milite avec ferveur pour l’adoption d’une loi fédérale sur les Canadiens handicapés. L’idée est de créer une législation fédérale qui complète les lois provinciales existantes et futures sur les personnes handicapées afin que l’ensemble du Canada devienne sans obstacle pour elles. Pour de plus amples renseignements, visitez le site de Canada sans barrières à http://barrierfreecanada.org/accueil/.

En ce moment, le Manitoba est la seule autre province à avoir une législation équivalente à la LAPHO. Elle porte le nom de Loi sur l’accessibilité pour les Manitobains. Là encore, il ne serait pas surprenant que d’autres provinces et territoires adoptent une législation sur les personnes handicapées à l’avenir. Plus précisément, des discussions ont lieu sur l’adoption ou la réforme de lois sur les personnes handicapées en Nouvelle-Écosse, en Colombie-Britannique, en Saskatchewan et à Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador. Vous pouvez vous renseigner sur les mesures législatives visant l’accessibilité de la Nouvelle-Écosse à http://novascotia.ca/coms/accessibility/ et sur les mesures en ce sens de la Colombie-Britannique (Accessibility 2024) à http://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/governments/about-the-bc-government/accessibility.

5.2.3  Contrainte excessive

Votre employeur peut refuser une demande de mesure d’adaptation qui imposerait une contrainte excessive (ou causerait un préjudice injustifié) à l’entreprise. La contrainte excessive est décrite comme le point au‑delà duquel votre employeur n’a pas l’obligation de vous fournir une mesure d’adaptation. Il n’y a pas de formule établie pour déterminer ce qui constitue une contrainte excessive.

Si votre employeur a choisi de vous refuser une demande d’adaptation, il a la responsabilité de prouver que la mesure d’adaptation lui aurait causé une contrainte excessive.

Suivent quelques facteurs que les tribunaux des droits de la personne examineront pour déterminer s’il y a contrainte excessive :

  • le coût financier (et le maintien d’un milieu de travail productif);
  • la dérogation aux dispositions d’une convention collective;
  • le risque de problèmes liés à d’autres employés;
  • la taille de l’entreprise et la polyvalence des milieux de travail;
  • les risques pour la santé et la sécurité liés à la mesure d’adaptation.

Le terme « préjudice injustifié » signifie qu’une certaine forme de préjudice est acceptable. Il est généralement reconnu en droit qu’une mesure d’adaptation peut imposer un fardeau financier à l’employeur. Le coût doit être plus que dérisoire pour qu’il soit considéré comme un préjudice injustifié ou une contrainte excessive.

Toutefois, on ne s’attend pas à ce que votre employeur mette la survie de l’entreprise à risque pour prendre des mesures d’adaptation pour vous. En plus, il n’a aucune obligation de modifier drastiquement le milieu de travail ou de créer un nouveau poste (comprenant des tâches inutiles) pour vous accommoder.

L’obligation d’adaptation de votre employeur pourrait aussi être différente selon qu’il s’agit d’une incapacité permanente ou temporaire. Dans bien des cas, une mesure d’adaptation de longue durée est plus susceptible de constituer une contrainte excessive qu’une mesure de courte durée. Les mesures d’adaptation de longue durée sont également plus susceptibles d’avoir une incidence plus grande sur les petits employeurs.

5.2.4  Exigence professionnelle justifiée

Un employeur peut invoquer une exigence professionnelle justifiée pour défendre sa décision de refuser une mesure d’adaptation demandée. Votre employeur peut agir ainsi lorsqu’il a une raison valable de le faire parce qu’une mesure nécessaire pour exécuter les tâches du poste particulier a été mise en place afin d’assurer l’efficience, l’économie ou la sécurité du travail. En plus, le refus doit être fait honnêtement et de bonne foi. En fin de compte, votre employeur doit démontrer :

  • que la mesure discriminatoire perçue a été adoptée à des fins liées logiquement à l’exécution du travail en question;
  • qu’il croyait sincèrement que la mesure était nécessaire pour l’exécution du travail en question;
  • que la mesure est, en fait, raisonnablement nécessaire pour l’exécution du travail en question puisqu’il serait impossible de prendre une mesure d’adaptation pour vous sans que cela constitue pour lui une contrainte excessive.

Pour illustrer ce concept, les situations suivantes sont des exemples de ce qui pourrait être considéré comme une exigence professionnelle justifiée :

  • ne pas employer une personne épileptique pour un poste exigeant la conduite d’un véhicule;
  • des normes d’acuité visuelle pour un travail de policier;
  • une évaluation de la condition physique pour le travail d’ambulancier paramédical;

Ce sont là des exemples où des exigences professionnelles justifiées pourraient entrer en jeu, mais il se peut quand même que l’employeur soit obligé de prendre une mesure d’adaptation en offrant un autre poste à l’employé.

Bien que ce test ait été établi en se fondant sur le Code des droits de la personne de l’Ontario, il a aussi été accepté dans la jurisprudence fédérale.

5.3   Droits et obligations

Toutes les parties à la relation d’emploi ont la responsabilité de participer à la recherche d’une solution afin de répondre aux besoins de l’employé.

5.3.1 Employé

En tant qu’employé, vous avez l’obligation d’informer votre employeur de toute mesure d’adaptation dont vous pourriez avoir besoin en raison d’une déficience. De façon précise, vous devez informer votre employeur de la nature de la déficience et de toute limitation fonctionnelle qui en découle, ainsi que des problèmes possibles qui pourraient survenir en raison de votre déficience (voir la section sur la divulgation).

Par limitations fonctionnelles, on entend les limitations que vous pourriez avoir qui sont causées par votre déficience et qui nuisent à votre capacité d’effectuer certaines tâches.

Vous pourriez être obligé d’accepter de faire l’objet d’évaluations pour appuyer votre demande, parce que votre employeur a le droit de recevoir des renseignements précis et pertinents concernant votre déficience. Si vous refusez de vous soumettre à une évaluation alors que l’employeur a le droit d’en demander une, on pourrait juger qu’il a rempli son obligation d’adaptation.

Vous devez garder à l’esprit que l’adaptation pourrait ne pas être parfaite, mais raisonnable. Par conséquent, lorsque votre employeur et votre syndicat font une proposition d’adaptation raisonnable, vous avez l’obligation de l’accepter et de faciliter sa mise en œuvre. Si vous choisissez de refuser une proposition de mesure d’adaptation, vous devez fournir une explication des raisons de votre refus et on pourrait juger que l’employeur a rempli son obligation.

Pour obtenir une mesure, certaines circonstances pourraient vous obliger à accepter un taux de rémunération moins élevé ou un travail temporaire, ou à suivre une nouvelle formation.

Lorsqu’une mesure d’adaptation est prise, vous avez la responsabilité d’informer votre employeur si jamais vos limitations fonctionnelles changeaient ou si l’adaptation ne fonctionnait pas comme prévu par les parties. Si vous ne le faites pas, il sera impossible de trouver une meilleure solution et votre employeur ne sera probablement pas tenu responsable.

Si vous avez l’impression de faire l’objet de discrimination dans le milieu de travail et que vous présentez une plainte à cet effet, vous aurez la responsabilité de démontrer devant un tribunal des droits de la personne que vous avez en fait été victime de discrimination pour un motif interdit.

5.3.2  Employeur

Bien que la participation de l’employé au processus d’adaptation soit nécessaire, en tant qu’employeur, vous êtes la personne responsable de trouver un moyen convenable de répondre aux besoins de votre employé.

Entre autres, vous avez l’obligation :

  • d’accepter une demande de mesure d’adaptation faite de bonne foi;
  • de chercher activement une mesure d’adaptation acceptable et de la mettre en place rapidement;
  • de maintenir la confidentialité;
  • d’expliquer clairement à votre employé les raisons pour lesquelles vous ne pouvez pas fournir l’adaptation, si c’est le cas.

Bien que vous ayez le droit de demander des renseignements pertinents concernant la déficience de votre employé, vous devriez limiter vos demandes à ceux qui sont pertinents pour évaluer les besoins d’adaptations de votre employé. Vous avez le droit de demander une évaluation des capacités fonctionnelles pour vous acquitter convenablement de vos obligations. Cela pourrait être plus difficile lorsqu’il s’agit de problèmes de santé mentale ou de toxicomanie. En tant qu’employeur, vous avez le droit de faire examiner l’employé par votre propre professionnel de la santé afin d’évaluer ses besoins d’adaptations et aussi d’examiner l’ampleur du préjudice ou de la contrainte que ces adaptations pourraient vous imposer.

Lorsque vous avez des préoccupations raisonnables et légitimes concernant les preuves médicales qu’un employé handicapé vous a fournies, vous avez le droit de demander des preuves additionnelles et meilleures afin de prendre une décision éclairée.

Si un employé porte plainte devant un tribunal des droits de la personne pour discrimination se fondant sur un motif interdit et que cette plainte est jugée fondée en droit, vous avez la responsabilité de démontrer 1) que la mesure d’adaptation vous aurait imposé une contrainte excessive, ou 2) qu’une exigence professionnelle justifiée vous avait permis de refuser une adaptation pour l’employé.

Enfin, de façon générale, vous avez maintenant l’obligation positive, en tant qu’employeur, d’éliminer les obstacles, politiques ou comportements discriminatoires dans le milieu de travail en intégrant la prise de mesures d’adaptation dans les politiques et usages jusqu’au point d’imposer une contrainte excessive.

5.3.3  Syndicat

Il est établi en droit qu’un syndicat a la même obligation qu’un employeur pour ce qui est de chercher activement une mesure d’adaptation raisonnable pour un employé handicapé. S’il ne le fait pas, le syndicat peut lui aussi être tenu responsable advenant une plainte pour discrimination.

6      La perte de votre emploi

6.1     Quand un employeur peut-il mettre fin à votre emploi?

6.1.1  Principes généraux

Si vous êtes un employé non syndiqué, votre employeur peut mettre fin à votre emploi d’une durée indéterminée à n’importe quel moment en vous donnant un préavis raisonnable ou en vous versant un paiement tenant lieu de préavis. De façon générale, le calcul de la longueur d’un « préavis raisonnable » se fonde sur une série de facteurs qui représentent le temps qu’il vous faudrait pour trouver un nouvel emploi semblable dans un nouveau milieu de travail. Un paiement tenant lieu d’avis est une autre solution qui prend la forme d’un paiement représentant votre rémunération pour la période de préavis raisonnable.

Si l’employeur a une raison valable de mettre fin à votre emploi, il n’a pas l’obligation de vous donner un préavis raisonnable. Suivent des exemples de circonstances où votre employeur pourrait mettre fin à votre emploi pour un « motif valable » :

  • insubordination;
  • incompétence;
  • malhonnêteté;
  • harcèlement;
  • manquement à une obligation fiduciaire;
  • accusations criminelles.

Quoi qu’il en soit, pour mettre fin à votre emploi pour un « motif valable », votre employeur doit s’acquitter d’un fardeau de la preuve très lourd.

6.1.2  Les droits de la personne et l’inexécution du contrat de travail

Votre employeur a l’obligation d’agir de bonne foi lorsqu’il met fin à votre emploi. Cela signifie qu’il ne peut pas le faire pour un motif de distinction illicite, comme mentionné dans les sections précédentes. Toutefois, il y a des exceptions à cette règle générale.

Par exemple, votre employeur a le droit de mettre fin à votre emploi lorsqu’il a eu inexécution du contrat de travail. Cela se produit lorsque l’employé est incapable d’effectuer les tâches essentielles prévues dans le contrat de travail même lorsque l’employeur a pris des mesures d’adaptation jusqu’au point de subir une contrainte excessive. Cela ne veut pas forcément dire que vous, en tant qu’employé, êtes en faute (c’est-à-dire que vous avez une incapacité permanente), mais cet état de fait est souvent lié à l’effet de votre incapacité d’exécuter le contrat de travail sur la productivité de l’employeur.

De façon plus précise, la jurisprudence actuelle établit que pour mettre fin à votre emploi, votre employeur doit produire des preuves indiquant :

  • que vous êtes incapable de satisfaire aux exigences du poste;
  • que des preuves médicales indiquent qu’il est improbable que votre état s’améliore à l’avenir;
  • qu’aucune autre mesure d’adaptation ne peut être prise sans que cela lui impose une contrainte excessive.

Il est aussi évident dans la jurisprudence que les employés ayant des déficiences permanentes ou de longue durée (comme des maladies causant des douleurs chroniques ou des problèmes de santé mentale qui mènent souvent à un absentéisme récurrent et excessif), et notamment ceux qui requièrent plus qu’une mesure d’adaptation isolée, sont les plus à risque de perdre leur emploi en raison de l’inexécution du contrat de travail.

Dans un milieu syndiqué, les principes directeurs pourraient être légèrement différents. Votre convention collective vous fournira généralement les renseignements nécessaires concernant un congédiement. En plus, vous devriez parler à votre représentant syndical pour déterminer de quelles options vous pourriez disposer.

Dans n’importe laquelle des situations ci‑dessus, votre employeur a l’obligation de vous informer si vous êtes à risque de perdre votre emploi. Si votre employeur ne le fait pas, votre congédiement pourrait être annulé.

6.2  Quels sont les droits de l’employé après la perte de son emploi?

Comme mentionné, si vous croyez que votre congédiement se fonde sur un motif de discrimination illicite, vous avez le droit de déposer une plainte auprès de la commission des droits de la personne ayant compétence dans votre province ou territoire.

7    Déposer une plainte auprès de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne

7.1   Aperçu

D’abord et avant tout, déposer une plainte auprès de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne devrait être votre dernier recours. Vous devriez vous assurer d’avoir épuisé tous les autres recours avant de déposer une plainte relative aux droits de la personne. Par exemple, avez-vous parlé à votre employeur ou à votre représentant syndical concernant des solutions possibles à votre problème lié aux droits de la personne?

La raison pour laquelle le dépôt d’une plainte devrait être votre dernier recours, c’est que le processus peut être très exigeant, long et peut aussi être très coûteux. Dans bien des cas, le résultat peut ne pas valoir le temps, l’effort et l’argent que vous y aurez consacrés. Pour cette raison, vous devriez déposer des plaintes fondées. Vous devriez obtenir des conseils juridiques pour savoir si votre cas a du mérite. Vous pouvez communiquer avec le Centre d’assistance juridique en matière de droits de la personne (http://www.hrlsc.on.ca/fr/accueil) pour obtenir de l’aide.

7.2    Le processus

7.2.1 Dépôt d’une plainte

Avant de déposer une plainte officielle, vous devez vous assurer d’être en mesure de vous plaindre. Votre plainte doit être 1) contre votre employeur ou un fournisseur de services, 2) fondée sur une pratique discriminatoire et 3) liée à un motif de discrimination que l’on trouve dans le Code canadien des droits de la personne (consultez l’outil d’évaluation préliminaire de plainte à http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/fra/node/155).

Comme mentionné ci‑dessus, vous pourriez aussi vouloir vous assurer que vous êtes un employé sous réglementation fédérale pour déposer une plainte auprès de la Commission canadienne des droits de la personne (consultez la section Quel type d’employé êtes-vous?).

Enfin, vous n’avez qu’un an (12 mois) à compter du moment du présumé acte discriminatoire pour déposer votre plainte.

Votre plainte doit être envoyée par la poste à :

Commission canadienne des droits de la personne

344, rue Slater, 8e étage

Ottawa (Ontario)  K1A 1E1

ou envoyée par télécopieur au 613-996-9661. Veuillez noter que vous ne pouvez pas envoyer votre formulaire de plainte électroniquement!

7.2.2  Une fois que vous aurez déposé votre plainte

Après que vous aurez déposé une plainte contre votre employeur, la Commission l’en informera. Il est illégal pour votre employeur d’user de représailles contre vous dans le milieu de travail parce que vous avez déposé une plainte relative aux droits de la personne.

La Commission décidera ensuite si elle traitera votre plainte. Il y a certaines raisons pour lesquelles la Commission pourrait choisir de ne pas traiter votre plainte. Par exemple, elle pourrait ne pas avoir les compétences pour le faire, si votre question n’est pas reliée à un motif de discrimination illicite, etc. (consultez http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/fra/content/a-quoi-dois-je-m%E2%80%99attendre).

Si la Commission traite votre plainte, vous et votre employeur pourriez vous faire offrir de soumettre votre différend à la médiation. Il s’agit d’une étape volontaire. Si cette voie est tentée et réussie, ou si elle n’est pas tentée du tout, votre plainte fera l’objet d’une enquête par la Commission.

Après l’enquête, la Commission prendra une décision. Elle peut rejeter votre plainte, l’envoyer en conciliation ou la renvoyer devant le Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne. La conciliation est semblable à la médiation et est une autre tentative pour régler le différend avant de le renvoyer au Tribunal.

7.2.3 Décision du Tribunal

Il est possible que votre affaire soit renvoyée au Tribunal canadien des droits de la personne. Le Tribunal prendra ensuite une décision sur le mérite de votre cas. Il peut estimer qu’il n’y a pas eu de discrimination et rejeter votre plainte OU il peut estimer qu’il y a eu discrimination. Dans ce dernier cas, le Tribunal peut imposer une mesure corrective.

7.3    À quoi devriez-vous vous attendre?

7.3.1 Mesures correctives

En ce qui concerne la compensation financière, le Tribunal peut vous accorder le dédommagement total de toutes vos pertes, ainsi qu’un maximum de 20 000 $ pour souffrances et douleurs et 20 000 $ pour discrimination délibérée. Il peut aussi ordonner à votre employeur de vous réintégrer dans votre emploi ou de créer et de mettre en œuvre des politiques sur les droits de la personne dans le milieu de travail.

7.3.2  Autres conséquences

Il est très important de ne pas oublier que ce processus est très long, et que si votre cas est renvoyé au Tribunal, il pourrait ne pas être entendu avant plusieurs années.

En plus, le dépôt d’une plainte pourrait ne rien vous coûter immédiatement, mais si vous choisissez d’obtenir des conseils juridiques indépendants pour donner suite à votre plainte, la démarche peut devenir très coûteuse.

Si vous choisissez de ne pas obtenir de conseils juridiques, vous risquez de faire des erreurs et de ne pas présenter votre cas adéquatement à l’arbitre, ce qui pourrait nuire à vos chances d’obtenir un résultat positif. Bien que les arbitres connaissent les obstacles juridiques auxquels font face les parties qui ne sont pas représentées, ils ne peuvent pas légalement aller jusqu’à vous aider à prouver le bien-fondé de votre plainte. Il est important d’avoir des preuves pertinentes et concrètes pour corroborer votre version des faits. En plus, il est important de vous familiariser davantage avec la procédure judiciaire.

Enfin, les renseignements et les conseils ci‑dessus sont importants pour que vous puissiez entamer le processus de plainte relative aux droits de la personne en ayant des attentes réalistes.

8    Renseignements sur les commissions des droits de la personne du
Canada

8.1   Canada (fédéral)

Commission canadienne des droits de la personne

Adresse:
344, rue Slater, 8e étage
Ottawa (Ontario)  K1A 1E1

Numéro sans frais : 1-888-214-1090
ATS: 1-888-643-3304
Téléc.: 613-996-9661

Site Web : http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/fra

Heures d’ouverture: du lundi au vendredi, de 8 h 00 à 20 h 00 (heure de l’Est)

8.2   Provinces

Commission des droits de la personne de l’Alberta
Bureau régional du Nord
10405, avenue Jasper N.-O., porte 800
Edmonton (Alberta)  T5J 4R7

Téléphone:
 780-427-7661Numéro sans frais (tous les bureaux): 1‑800-232-7215
Téléc.: 780-427-6013
ATS: 780‑427-1597

Heures d’ouverture : 8 h 15 à 16 h 30

Bureau régional du Sud
200, J.J. Bowlen Building
620 – 7th Avenue SW
Calgary (Alberta)  T2P 0Y8

Téléphone: 403-297-6571
Numéro sans frais (tous les bureaux): 1‑800‑232-7215

Téléc.: 403‑297-6567
ATS403-297-5639

Heures d’ouverture: 8 h 15 à 16 h 30
Courrielhumanrights@gov.ab.ca

Site Webhttp ://www.albertahumanrights.ab.ca/

Tribunal des droits de la personne de la Colombie-Britannique

Adresse
605, rue Robson, porte 1170
Vancouver (C.-B.)  V6B 5J3

Téléphone: 604-775-2000

Numéro sans frais: 1-888-440-8844

Téléc.: 604-775-2020

ATS: 604-775-2021

Heures d’ouverture: du lundi au vendredi, de 8 h 30 à 16 h 30

CourrielBCHumanRightsTribunal@gov.bc.ca

Site Webhttp ://www.bchrt.bc.ca/


Commission des droits de la personne et des droits de la jeunesse
 (Québec)

Adresse (siège social)
360, rue Saint-Jacques, 2e étage
Montréal (Québec)  H2Y 1P5

Accès pour les personnes à mobilité réduite:

361, rue Notre-Dame Ouest

Téléphone: 514-873-5146
Numéro sans frais: 1-800-361-6477
Téléc.: 514-873-6032
Heures d’ouverture: du lundi au vendredi, de 8 h 30 à midi et de 13 h 00 à 16 h 30
Courrielaccueil@cdpdj.qc.ca
Site Web: http ://www.cdpdj.qc.ca/en/Pages/default.aspx

 Emplacements d’autres bureaux: Québec, Saguenay, Saint-Jérôme, Sept-Îles, Sherbrooke, Trois-Rivières, Val-d’Or

Commission des droits de la personne du Manitoba

Bureau de Winnipeg

175, rue Hargrave, porte 700
Winnipeg (Manitoba)  R3C 3R8
Téléphone: 204-945-3007
Téléc.: 204-945-1292

Bureau de Brandon

3341 – 40 Ninth Street
Brandon (Manitoba)  R7A 6C2
Téléphone: 204-726-6261
Téléc.: 204-726-6035

Numéro sans frais: 1-888-884-8681
ATS: 1-888-897-2811
Courrielhrc@gov.mb.ca

Site Web: http://www.manitobahumanrights.ca/

Commission des droits de la personne du Nouveau-Brunswick

Adresse
Maison Barry
C.P. 6000
Fredericton (Nouveau-Brunswick)  E3B 5H1

Téléphone: 506-453-2301
Numéro sans frais: 1-888-471-2233

Téléc.: 506-453-2653
ATS: 506-453-2911

Heures d’ouverture: du lundi au vendredi, de 8 h 15 à 16 h 30
Courrielhrc.cdp@gnb.ca

Site Web: http://www2.gnb.ca/content/gnb/fr/ministeres/cdpnb.html

Commission des droits de la personne de Terre-Neuve-et-Labrador

Adresse
The Beothuk Building
21 Crosbie Place
C.P. 8700

St. John’s (T.-N.-L.)  A1B 4J6

Téléphone: 709-729-2709
Numéro sans frais: 1-800-563-5808
Téléc.: 709-729-0790

Courrielhumanrights@gov.nl.ca
Site Webhttp ://www.justice.gov.nl.ca/hrc/index.html

Commission des droits de la personne de la Nouvelle-Écosse 

Adresse (siège social)
5657 Spring Garden Road
Park Lane Terrace
Halifax (Nouvelle-Écosse)  B3J 1H1
3e étage, porte 305

Téléphone: 902-424-4111
Numéro sans frais (tous les bureaux): 1‑877‑269‑7699
Téléc.: 902‑424-0596
ATS: Services disponibles via 711

Courrielhrcinquiries@novascotia.ca
Site Webhttps ://humanrights.novascotia.ca/

Autres bureaux: Sydney et Digby

Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne

Adresse
180, rue Dundas Ouest, 9e étage
Toronto (Ontario)  M7A 2R9

Téléphone: 416-326-9511
Numéro sans frais: 1-800-387-9080
ATS (local): 416-326-0603
ATS (sans frais): 1-800-308-5561

Courriel
info@ohrc.on.ca
Site Webhttp ://www.ohrc.on.ca/

Consultez aussi le Centre d’assistance juridique en matière de droits de la personne

Adresse
180, rue Dundas Ouest, 8e étage
Toronto (Ontario)  M7A 0A1

Téléphone: 416-597-4900
Numéro sans frais: 1-866-625-5179
ATS: 416-597-4903
ATS sans frais: 1-866-612-8627
Site Webhttp://www.hrlsc.on.ca/fr/accueil

Commission des droits de la personne de l’Île-du-Prince-Édouard

Adresse
53, rue Water
C.P. 2000
Charlottetown (Î.-P.-É.)  C1A 7N8

Téléphone: 902-368-4180
Numéro sans frais: 1-800-237-5031
Téléc.: 902-368-4236

Courriel: contact@peihumanrights.ca
Site Webhttp ://www.gov.pe.ca/humanrights/

Commission des droits de la personne de la Saskatchewan

Adresse
Suite 816, Sturdy Stone Building
122-3rd Avenue North
Saskatoon (Saskatchewan)  S7K 2H6

Téléphone: 306-933-5952
Numéro sans frais:  1-800-667-9249
Téléc.: 306-933-7863 

Courriel:  shrc@gov.sk.ca
Site Webhttp://saskatchewanhumanrights.ca/

8.3   Territoires

Commission des droits de la personne des Territoires du Nord-Ouest

Adresse
Édifice Laing, rez-de-chaussée
5003, 49e Rue
Yellowknife (T.N.-O.)  X1A 2L9

Téléphone: 867-669-5575
Numéro sans frais: 1-888-669-5575
Téléc.: 867-873-0357

Courrielinfo@nwthumanrights.ca
Site Webhttp://nwthumanrights.ca/?lang=fr

Heures d’ouverture: du lundi au vendredi, de 8 h 30 à 17 h 00

Tribunal des droits de la personne du Nunavut

Adresse
C.P. 15Coral Harbour (Nunavut)
X0C 0C0

Numéro sans frais: 1-866-413-6478
Téléc. sans frais: 1-888-220-1011

Courrielnunavuthumanrights@gov.nu.ca
Site Webhttp://www.nhrt.ca/french/home

Heures d’ouverture:

D’avril à octobre: 8 h 30 à 17 h 00 (heure du Centre)
De novembre à mars: 8 h 30 à 17 h 00 (heure de l’Est)

Note: Coral Harbour, au Nunavut, ne change pas l’heure.

Commission des droits de la personne du Yukon

Adresse

101-9010 Quartz Road
Whitehorse (Yukon)  Y1A 2Z5

Téléphone: 867-667-6226
Numéro sans frais: 1-800-661-0535
Téléc.: 867-667-2662

Courriel:
 humanrights@yhrc.yk.ca
Site Webhttp://www.yhrc.yk.ca/

Heures d’ouverture:
 du lundi au vendredi, de 8 h 30 à 16 h 30, sauf les mardis lorsque nous sommes fermés au public de 8 h 30 à midi.

9    Sources consultées

9.1   Articles

COMMISSION CANADIENNE DES DROITS DE LA PERSONNE et MINISTRE DES TRAVAUX PUBLICS ET SERVICES GOUVERNEMENTAUX. Une place pour tous : Guide pour la création d’un milieu de travail inclusif, consulté en ligne à <https://www.chrc-ccdp.ca/sites/default/files/uneplacepourtous_1.pdf>.

D’ANDREA, James. Illness and Disability in the Workplace: How to Navigate Through the Legal Minefield, Canada Law Book, mai 2005.

GORDON, Phyllis. Une Loi canadienne pour les personnes handicapées : Possibilités et défis. Document commandé par le Conseil des Canadiens avec déficiences et l’Association canadienne pour l’intégration communautaire, 2006, consulté en ligne à <http://www.ccdonline.ca/en/socialpolicy/fda/1006#II>.

GOUVERNEMENT DU CANADA. Obligation de prendre des mesures d’adaptation : Démarche générale à l’intention des gestionnaires, novembre 2011, document consulté en ligne à <https://www.canada.ca/fr/secretariat-conseil-tresor/services/valeurs-ethique/diversite-equite/obligation-prendre-mesures-adaptation-demarche-generale-intention-gestionnaires.html>.

JOHNSON, Richard B. « Your Legal Rights and Responsibilities around Disclosure », Transition Magazine, printemps 2016.

LEVITT, Howard A., The Law of Dismissal in Canada, Third Edition, Canada Law Book, décembre 2003.

LYNK, Michael. The Duty to Accommodate in the Canadian Workplace: Leading Principles and Recent Case, 2008, document consulté en ligne à <http://ofl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2008.06.21-Report-DutytoAccommodate.pdf>.

UNIVERSITÉ BROCK. « Disclosure », document consulté en ligne à <https://brocku.ca/career-services/bridge-to-success/students/disclosure>.

9.2   Sites Web

Accessibility Ontario. <http://www.accessontario.com>.

AODA Alliance. <http://www.aodaalliance.org/>.

Canada sans barrières. <http://barrierfreecanada.org/accueil/>.

Centre d’assistance juridique en matière de droits de la personne. <http://www.hrlsc.on.ca/fr/accueil>.

Commission canadienne des droits de la personne. <http://www.chrc-ccdp.gc.ca/index.html>.

9.3   Jurisprudence

Andrews c. Law Society of British Columbia, [1989] 1 SCR 143.

Colombie-Britannique (Public Service Employee Relations Commission) c. BCGSEU [1999] 3 RCS 3 (Meiorin).

Colombie-Britannique (Public Service Employee Relations Commission) c. BCGSEU [1999] 3 RCS 3 (Grismer)

Byers Transport Ltd v Teamsters, Local 213 (2002), 68 CLAS 316.

Canadian Pacific Ltd and BMWE (1996), 57 LAC (4e) 129 (arbitre : MG Picher).

Central Alberta Dairy Pool c. Alberta (Commission des droits de la personne) [1990] 2 RCS 489.

GSW Heating Products Co and USWA (1996), 56 LAC (4e) 249 (arbitre : Barrett).

Guibord v The Queen (1996), 97 CLLC paras 230-019 (FCTD).

Holmes c. Canada (Procureur général) [1997] 130 FTR 251.

Hydro-Québec c. Syndicat des employé-e-s de techniques professionnelles et de bureau d’Hydro-Québec, section locale 2000 (SCFP-FTQ) 2008 CSC 43      [2008] 2 RCS 561.

Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne c. Simpsons-Sears [1985] 2 RCS 536.

Commission ontarienne des droits de la personne c. Etobicoke, [1982] 1 R.C.S. 202.

Re Alcan Smelters and Chemicals Ltd (1996), 55 LAC (4e) 261 (arbitre : Hope).

Re Calgary District Hospital Group (1995), 41 LAC (4e) 319.

Re Greater Niagara General Hospital (1995), 50 LAC. (4e) 34.

Central Okanagan School District No. 23 c. Renaud [1992] 2 RCS 970.

Ontario Hydro c. Ontario (Commission des relations de travail), [1993] 3 R.C.S. 327

TCC Bottling Ltd and RWDSU, Local 1065 (1993), 32 LAC (4e) 73 (arbitre : Christie).

9.4  Lois

Code canadien du travail, LRC 1985, c L-2.

Loi canadienne sur les droits de la personne, LRC 1985, c H-6.

Loi constitutionnelle de 1982, 30 et 31 Victoria, ch. 3 (R.-U.), art. 91, 92.

Loi de 2005 sur l’accessibilité pour les personnes handicapées de l’Ontario, L.O. 2005, chap. 11.

Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi (L.C. 1995, ch. 44).

Cet exposé sur l’obligation d’adaptation a été rédigé par Samantha Dubord dans le cadre d’un stage sur les droits de la personne et la justice sociale auprès de l’Association nationale des étudiants(es) handicapés(es) au niveau postsecondaire, offert par le cabinet Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne et Yazbeck S.R.L. Le cabinet Raven, Cameron, Ballantyne et Yazbeck S.R.L. a son siège à Ottawa, en Ontario, et se spécialise de façon particulière en droit du travail, de l’emploi et en matière de droits de la personne. Samantha a commencé son stage en juillet 2017.

[1] Habituellement, on parle d’un emploi reconfiguré lorsque l’employeur réorganise ou restructure les tâches du poste (sans qu’il y ait contrainte excessive) afin de répondre aux besoins de l’employé. Il s’agit habituellement d’une option viable dans un grand milieu de travail où il y a de nombreuses tâches et fonctions différentes.